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TOLEDO 

GLASS 

SIATIONALDI 




TOLEDO GLASS NATIONAL IE 

Third in a series of 

national exhibitions for 

Designer-Craftsmen in Glass 

Organized and first shown by 

THE TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART 

October 18-November 15, 1970 



a selection circulated for exhibition tour by 
The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service 

1970-1971 



Abbreviations 



ACC: 
Alfred: 

Austin: 

Berkeley: 
Boston: 

Chico: 

Craftsmen: 

Dallas: 

Excellence: 

Haystack: 
NCECA: 

Objects USA: 

Penland: 
Scripps: 

TGN: 

TMA: 
Toronto: 

Wichita: 

Young Americans: 



American Craftsmen's Council. 

State University of New York College of Ceramics, 
Alfred, N. Y. 

First Survey of Contemporary American Crafts, Uni- 
versity Art Museum, University of Texas, 1967. 

University of California, Berkeley. 

Contemporary American Blown Glass, Society of 
Arts & Crafts, Boston 1966. 

Chico State College Glass Invitational, Chico, Cali- 
fornia, 1969. 

Craftsmen USA '66, Museum of Contemporary Crafts, 
New York 1966. 

Air, Light, Form: New American Glass, Dallas Museum 
of Fine Arts 1967. 

The Excellence of the Object, Museum of Contem- 
porary Crafts, New York 1969. 

Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Deer Isle, Maine. 

National Glass Invitational, California College of Arts 
and Crafts Galleries, Oakland 1970. Sponsored by 
National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts. 

Objects USA, The Johnson Wax Collection, circu- 
lated by the Smithsonian Institution, 1969-70. 

Penland School of Crafts, Penland, North Carolina. 

Scripps College Invitational, Scripps College, Clare- 
mont, California (Annual). 

Toledo Glass National, The Toledo Museum of Art, 
Toledo, Ohio (Biennial). 

The Toledo Museum of Art. 

Contemporary Offhand Blown Glass Exhibition, Sheri- 
dan College, Port Credit, Ontario 1970. 

National Decorative Arts - Ceramics Exhibition, 
Wichita Art Association, Wichita, Kansas (Annual). 

Young Americans, Museum of Contemporary Crafts, 
New York 1969 (sponsored by ACC). 

Indicates award. 



INTRODUCTION 



In 1962 The Toledo Museum of Art established its 
first creative glass workshop in a small garage on 
the Museum grounds. The chances for reestablishing 
glass on a new basis as an art medium were unknown, 
but today, only eight years later, glass is taught as a 
creative medium in many universities and art schools 
throughout the country. This development would not 
have been possible without the enthusiasm of artists 
such as Harvey Littleton, Dominick Labino and others 
who participated in the Museum's pioneer programs, 
nor without the generous technical assistance of the 
Toledo-based glass industries. Many of those teach- 
ing today participated in the first Toledo workshop or 
the several succeeding seminars held subsequently 
at Toledo. 

The first Toledo Glass National, a competitive 
exhibition held in 1966 demonstrated that glass as a 
medium for individual expression had potential for 
survival if further encouraged. Toledo, Madison, 
Wisconsin and Berkeley, California provided this en- 
couragement in additional workshops. By the time of 
the second Glass National of 1968 it was obvious 
that the movement had matured. This second Glass 
National included the work of glass craftsmen from 
many parts of our country. 

Today, as we embark on a new decade, the artists 
working in glass are reaching for new forms, combin- 
ing glass with other materials, and developing new 
techniques independent of industrial technology. 
They are exploring new horizons as part of the main- 
stream of contemporary art. 

Four years ago, it was easy for the Toledo Museum 
to keep in touch with most of the glass artists in the 
country. Now, it is virtually impossible. As the field of 
creative glass has expanded enormously, it seemed 
appropriate to make this third Toledo Glass National 
an invitational exhibition in order to recognize the 
achievement of some of those who have contributed 
most to the growth of the field and to present their 
work in greater depth. Practical requirements have 
limited the invitations to ten artists. The roster could 



have been twice as long if space and funds were 
unlimited. 

Man's first use of glass is lost in the unwritten pages 
of prehistory, but ever since his life and times have 
been recorded, he has produced his best glass when 
the social and scientific climate has been most 
favorable. 

Today, glass has become such a basic commodity 
that modern living would be unthinkable without it. 
Until recently, the sheer volume of commercial pro- 
duction has overwhelmed the creation of glass for the 
sake of its unique visual properties of clarity, color, 
and ductile form. But in the past few years, a fusion 
of creative and technological interests, together 
with a broadened base of concern for contemporary 
art has reversed this trend. 

Glass as an art has now to a large degree devel- 
oped beyond technically competent vessels, vases, 
or bowls to include glass as a sculptural medium. 
Glass as a material for sculpture has unique visual 
and ductile properties far different from the traditional 
substances of bronze and steel. 

The early efforts of such artists in glass as Tiffany, 
Galle, and Marinot, the forebears of today's glass 
artists, are at last bearing fruit in the fertile soil of a 
culturally concerned, technologically oriented 
civilization. 

We would like to thank all the participants in the 
exhibition for lending their precious and fragile 
works, for their help, advice and cooperation; and 
also to thank Charles F. Gunther and Rudolf M. 
Riefstahl of the Museum staff who have organized 
this exhibition. We are grateful to the Smithsonian 
Institution for making possible a wider audience for 
this exhibition through their Traveling Exhibition 
Service. 

Otto Wittmann 

Director 

The Toledo Museum of Art 




Andre G. Billed 



Background: State University of New York College 
of Ceramics B. F. A. 1960, M. F. A. 1961. Began work- 
ing in glass in 1963 with retired glassblowers from 
Steuben Glassworks. Designed and built facilities 
for and responsible for development and teaching of 
art glass program at Alfred University. TMA Glass 
Workshop 1967. Present Position: State University of 
New York College of Ceramics. 

Selected Exhibitions: (Group) TGN I 1966; *TGN II 
1968; Scripps 1968; Excellence 1969-70; Objects USA 
1969-70; Toronto 1970. (One Man) Lowe Art Center, 
Syracuse University 1968; New York State University 
at Buffalo 1968; Corning Museum of Glass 1969-70; 
New York State University at Potsdam 1970; Museum 
of Contemporary Crafts New York 1970. 

Collections: TMA, Corning Museum of Glass; Ad- 
dison Gallery of American Art, Andover, Massachu- 
setts; National Gallery, Prague, Czechoslovakia. 



Works: 1. Selenium orange Form. 4Vz, x 9, x 7 
inches. Offhand formed sculpture of selenium 
doped glass. Amethyst and air inclusions. 

2. Crystalline Glass Form. 3Vi, x 6V2, x WV2 inches. 
Offhand formed sculpture of clear crystalline glass. 
Two large air and chrome green inclusions. 

3. Neodymium Dichroic Form. 4V2, x 5Vz, x HV2 
inches. Offhand formed sculpture of neodymium 
doped glass containing one large air inclusion 
and struck between gathers. 4. Clear Glass Form 
5, x 5 1 /2, x IV/2 inches. Offhand formed sculpture 
of clear glass containing 2 large airtraps and 
inclusions of amber glass. 5. Neodymium 
Dichroic Form. 4V2, x 10, x 16 inches. Offhand 
formed sculpture of neodymium glass containing 
amethyst and air inclusions. 6. Neodymium 
Dichroic Forms. 13, x 12, x 12 inches. Two offhand 
formed related pieces grouped on a light 
environment to form a single sculpture, both 

have amethyst and air inclusions. 7. Praseodymium 
& Neodymium Dichroic Forms. 9, x 12, x 9 inches. 
Two offhand formed related pieces grouped on a 
cast epoxy base. Both forms have blue and air 
inclusions. 8. Four Interlocking Struck Silver 
Forms. 33, x 16, x 14 inches. Four offhand formed 
pieces interlocked in pairs and grouped on a light 
environment. The struck silver glass exhibits 
surface iridescence; it exhibits color change from 
transmitted to reflected light. 9. Cast Slab 
Sculpture. 48, x 18, x 7 inches. Composite of four 
cast pieces of nickel brown and struck silver glass. 
10. Cast Architectural Slab. 12, x 14, x 2 inches. 
Composite molten glass & cullet fused into a slab on 
light box with frosted glass and polyester baffle. 



Illustrated 
No. 6 




Background: (Chihuly) University of Washington 
B. A. 1965; University of Wisconsin M. S. 1967; Rhode 
Island School of Design M. F. A. 1968. Grants: Tiffany 
Foundation 1967-8; Fulbright 1968-9. Designer for 
John Graham Architects, Seattle 1965-6; Venini 
Glassworks, Venice, Italy 1968-9. Taught summers at 
Haystack and Berkeley. Toledo Museum of Art Glass 
Workshop 1967. Present Position: Rhode Island 
School of Design. (Carpenter) studied botanical 
illustration in Austria. Botanical expeditions to Peru, 
Colombia, Brazil, Madagascar, and Labrador. Illustra- 
tion major, Rhode Island School of Design 1968. 
Chihuly and Carpenter have been working together 
developing botanical and zoological forms with the 
cooperation of Richmond Kent of Audio Applications 
and Bob Reed of Nepco Neon. 
Selected Exhibitions: Omitted at the request of the 
artist. 

Collections: Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York; Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 



Dale Chihuly (with collaboration 
of Jamie Carpenter) 



Works: 1. Orchis Pubescence. Two manganese 
forms with neon gas on 28 inch base. 2. Monotropa 
Uniflora. Blue form with argon gas on 28 inch base. 
3. Physalia Deluxeus. Blue form with argon gas and 
transformer on 3 by 6 foot base. 4. Medusae 
Superioris Livid Rubid. Nine ruby forms one with 
argon gas on 5 by 6 foot base. 



Illustrated 
No. 2 




Background: Hiram College, B. A. 1962; University of 
Iowa, M. A. 1965; University of Wisconsin, M. F. A. 
1967. Faculty TMA Glass Workshop 1968. Taught 
summers at Penland 1967-70; Art Institute of Chicago 
1970. Participated in design and construction of TMA 
glassworking studio. Chairman, Publishing Commit- 
tee, NCECA. Present Position: The Toledo Museum 
of Art. 

Selected Exhibitions: (Group) *TGN I 1966; *TGN 
II 1968; Wichita 1966; Scripps 1967-68; Dallas 1967; 
Chico 1969; Young Americans 1969; Objects USA 
1969-70; NCECA 1970. (One Man) Cranbrook Acade- 
my of Art, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 1968; TMA 1969; 
Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, 
Kentucky 1969. 

Collections: TMA; Krannert Art Museum, University 
of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. 



C. Fritz Dreisbach 



Works: 1. Pair of Faqon de Venise with Witches 
Balls. 14 and 72% inches high. Offhand and molded 
glass with yellow feather-festoon patterns. 
2. Footed Yellow Zigzag. 10% inches high. Offhand 
glass with festoon-feather pattern. 3. Red Peace 
Heart on White Velvet PHIow. 8 3 A inches 
maximum dimension of glass. Free-blown glass 
with cold-joined flower finial and fabric dangle. 
4. Hard Pillow Striped Piece— Amber. 5Vi by 8% 
by 5 inches. Free-blown glass on marble slab. 
5a-h. Witches Ball Series. 6V2 to 12 inches high. 
Witches balls were used as covers for vessels from 
the 17th to 19th centuries. At some point they were 
also given the task of capturing evil spirits, 
protecting the vessel, home, or workshop. 6. Hot 
Wheels— Straightaway Grandstand View. Blown, 
molded, and hot-tooled forms on commercial 
glass base 47 by 24 inches. 



Illustrated 

Left to right, No. 1 (pair), No. 8h 




Robert C. Fritz 



Background: San Jose State College B. A., M. A., 
The Ohio State University Ph.D. Scholarships in 
painting and jewelry at California College of Arts 
and Crafts; in glass at University of Wisconsin. TMA 
Glass Workshop 1966. Studied with Erwin Eisch. 
Workshop leader American Craftsmens Council 
Southwest Regional Conference 1966, 1968. Present 
Position: San Jose State College. 

Selected Exhibitions: (Group) *TGN I 1966; TGN II 
1968; Boston 1966; Austin 1967; Dallas 1967; Scripps 
1968; Objects USA 1969-70; Toronto 1970. (One Man) 
The Egg and the Eye, Los Angeles. 

Collections: Oakland Art Museum; Fine Arts Gallery 
of San Diego; TMA; E. B. Crocker Art Gallery, Sacra- 
mento; Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, Lincoln, 
Nebraska. 



Works: 1. Phoenix. 14 inches high. Fumed blue 
with clear (Lent by the Oakland Art Museum). 

2. Tiffany Romp #3. 11 inches high. Fumed clear. 

3. Vase Form. 17 inches high. Smoky fumed. 

4. Multiple Top Form. 14 inches high. Clear with 
carbon smoke. 5. Vase Form. 7 inches high. Double 
neck— clear with smoky trail, slightly fumed. 

6. Weed Vase Form. 10 inches high. Fumed blue 
with clear. 7. Weed Bowl. 6 inches high. Slightly 
amber, fumed. 8. Windows II. 6 inches high. Clear 
with carbon smoking. 9. Madonna's Grace. 7 inches 
high. Clear, slightly fumed. 



Illustrated 

Left to right, No. 2, No. 3 




Kent F. Ipsen 



Background: University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee 
B. S.; University of Wisconsin, Madison M. S., M. F. A. 
Taught art in Wisconsin Public Schools. Taught 
ceramics and glass at Mankato State College, Min- 
nesota. TMA Glass Workshop 1966. Present Position: 
Art Institute of Chicago. 

Selected Exhibitions: (Group) Wisconsin Designer- 
Craftsmen *1964, 1966, *1968; TGN I 1966; *TGN II 
1968; Scripps 1967; "Southern Tier Craft Show, Corn- 
ing 1967; Chico 1969; Objects USA 1969-70; Toronto 
1970. (One Man) Mankato State College, Minnesota; 
Kalamazoo Art Center; Art Institute of Chicago 1969. 

Collections: La Crosse State University, Wisconsin; 
Kalamazoo Art Center; Western Michigan University; 
Bergstrom Art Center, Neenah, Wisconsin. 



Works: 1. Glass-steel Form. 74Vz inches high. Pale 
blue glass joined to steel form suspended in steel 
frame. 2. Blue Globe. 12 inches high. Blue form, 
blue applique, clear lip. 3. Collapsed Vase. 12 
inches high. Gray-green glass, collapsed wall. 
4. Vase on clear column. 12 inches high. 
Gray-green and clear glass. 5. Red Vase. 14 inches 
high. Selenium ruby glass with red applique. 
6. Bottle. 13 inches high. Gray-yellow-green with 
thin white neon lip. 7. Bottle. 24 inches high. 
Mold-blown clear with blue applique sandblasted. 



Illustrated 

Left to right, No. 3, No. 6, No. 4 




Dominick Labino 



Background: Carnegie Institute of Technology; 
TMA School of Design. Former Vice-president for 
Research, Johns Manville Fiber Glass Inc. More than 
50 patents in glass technology. Adviser and Faculty 
TMA Glass Workshops 1962-70. Design consultant 
TMA glassworking studio. Author, Visual Art in Glass. 
Honorary Curator of Glass, Toledo Museum of Art. 
Present Position: glass research consultant. 

Selected Exhibitions: (Group)Scripps 1965-7; Wichita 
1966;*TGN 1 1966;*TGN I1 1968; 'Craftsmen 1966; Austin 
1967; Dallas 1967; Objects USA 1969-70; Toronto 
1970. (One Man) TMA 1965; Bowling Green State 
University, Ohio 1965, 1966, 1969; Bergstrom Art 
Center, Neenah, Wisconsin 1967; Phoenix Art Muse- 
um 1969; Corning Museum of Glass 1969; Columbus 
Gallery of Fine Arts 1970. 

Collections: TMA; Corning Museum of Glass; Cleve- 
land Museum of Art; Wichita Art Association; Berg- 
strom Art Center, Neenah, Wisconsin. 



Works: 1. Hanging Lamp. 6 panels I6V2 by 6V* 
inches. 6 framed panels executed in free-hand 
molten inlay. Pale cobalt glass with hot inlay 
design in silver schmeltz-glass. 2. Cellular 
Structure. 17 by 12V2 inches (4 panels; 17 by 18 
inches (1 panel). 5 cast panels executed in 
free-hand molten inlay on illuminated base. 
3. Macro-molecules. 32 by 36 inches. Cast panel 
executed in free-hand molten inlay — copper, 
silver and cadmium glass. 4. Underwater 
Rendezvous. 9 inches high; 6 3 A inches width. 
Free-standing hot-glass sculpture — cadmium with 
interior silver-glass forms. 5. Emergence III. 
9 inches high. Free-standing hot-glass sculpture- 
cobalt blue with interior gold veilings and air 
forms. 6. Chalice and Paten. 7 inches high; Paten 
6 inches in diameter. Chalice with bowl in copper 
ruby, foot in silver glass; paten in copper ruby. 
7. Spherical Form. 4V* inches high. Copper glass 
with paperweight technigue in opaque white and 
chrome green enclosed. 8. Reflections. 4Va inches 
high. Transparent cadmium glass with opaque 
cadmium glass design in paperweight technique 
enclosed. 9. Large Bowl. 7% inches high. Cobalt 
blue glass with multi-colored glass design in 
paperweight technique enclosed. 10. On the 
Ocean Floor. 6 inches high. Cobalt and copper 
glass with opaque cadmium glass design in 
paperweight technique and moss and algae effect. 



Illustrated 

Left to right, No. 10, No. 4 




Background: University of Illinois B. F. A. 1961; Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin M. S., M. F. A. 1964. Taught at 
University of Wisconsin 1964; California College of 
Arts and Crafts, Oakland 1967; San Francisco Art 
Institute 1968. Taught summer at Haystack 1967. 
TMA Glass Workshop 1966. Extensive research and 
lecturing in Europe. Participated in Congress of 
International Commission on Glass, Vaxjo, Sweden 
1970; 4th World Crafts Council, Dublin 1970. Present 
Position: University of California, Berkeley. 

Selected Exhibitions: (Group) 1st World Congress 
of Craftsmen, Columbia University, New York 1964; 
Scripps 1965, 1968; TGN I 1966; *TGN II 1968; 'Crafts- 
men 1966; Boston 1966; Austin 1967; Dallas 1967; 
Wichita 1968, 1970; Young Americans 1969; Chico 
1969; Excellence 1969-70; Objects USA 1969-70; 
NCECA 1970; Attitudes, Brooklyn Museum 1970. 
(One Man) San Francisco Museum of Art 1967; Mu- 
seum of Contemporary Crafts, New York 1969; Lee 
Nordness, New York 1969; California College of Arts 
and Crafts, Oakland 1970. 

Collections: Museum of Contemporary Crafts, 
New York; Milwaukee Art Center; Oakland Art 
Museum; San Francisco Art Museum; Museum of 
Contemporary Art, Skopje, Yugoslavia; TMA; 
National Musuem of Glass, Leerdam, Holland; 
Boymans Museum, Rotterdam. 



Marvin B. Lipofsky 



Work: California Loop Series. Environment of 
variable size. Flocked blown glass form with 
"countersets" of silk screen plastic, canvas, and 
flat and inflatable vinyl. 







^ 



r\ 




Harvey K. Littleton 



Background: Brighton School of Art, England 1945; 
University of Michigan, B. D. 1947; Cranbrook Aca- 
demy of Art, M. F. A. 1951. Grants: University of Wis- 
consin Research Committee 1954, 1957, 1962; TMA 
1962; Tiffany Foundation 1970. Extensive glass 
research in Europe. Has worked with Erwin Eisch. 
Taught ceramics at Ann Arbor Potters' Guild, TMA, 
and University of Wisconsin. Faculty TMA Glass 
Workshops 1962, 1968, 1970. Present Position: Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, Madison. 

Selected Exhibitions: (Group) 13th Triennale Exhibi- 
tion of Architectural and Decorative Art, Milan, Italy 
1964; Craftsmen 1966; Boston 1966; *TGN I 1966; 
Austin 1967; Dallas 1967; Virj Glas, Boymans Museum, 
Rotterdam 1969; Objects USA 1969-70. (One Man) 
Art Institute of Chicago 1963; Corning Museum of 
Glass 1964; Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New 
York 1965; Milwaukee Art Center 1966; Handwerks- 
kammer, Cologne 1969; Handwerkskammer, Munich 
1969; Lee Nordness, New York 1969. 

Collections: Museum of Modern Art, New York; 
Kunstgewerbe Museum, Cologne; Victoria and Albert 
Museum, London; Smithsonian Institution, Washing- 
ton; Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, 
Massachusetts; Museum of Contemporary Crafts, 
New York; Corning Museum of Glass; TMA; Milwaukee 
Art Center. 



Works: 1. Blue Wind. 34 3 A by 21 Vi by 10 inches. 
Crystal with copper stripes. 2. Affinity. 26 by 29Vi 
by 4 inches. Selenium Glass with aluminum. 
3. Column III. 52 inches high. Selenium glass 
with aluminum. 4. Opportunity Trap. 13V2 by 22V* 
by 12 inches. Manganese copper glass. 5. Triumph. 
16 by I8V2 by 4 inches. Crystal with copper and 
aluminum. 6. Interaction. 10 by 14 by WV2 inches. 
Selenium, copper and plate glass. 7. Homage to 
Dali. IV/2 by UV2 by 5 inches. Selenium glass 
with aluminum and plate. 8. Blue Eye. 12V2 inches 
high. Hemispheres on cored column with brass 
base. 9. Green Eye. 12V2 inches high. Hemispheres 
on crystal column. 



Illustrated 
No. 7 




Background: University of California B. A. 1967. 
Eisner Award in Design 1967. President's Undergrad- 
uate Fellowship for Creative Research (Berkeley) 
1968. Fulbright Fellowship (Italy) 1969-70. Worked 
with Santillana at Venini Glass Factory and collab- 
orated with Robert Naess. Present Position: University 
of Washington, Seattle. 

Selected Exhibitions: (Group) TGN 1 1966; TGN II 
1968; Scripps 1967-8; Austin 1967; Young Americans 
1969; Objects USA 1969-70; Excellence 1969; NCECA 
1969; Five Americans in Italy, Rome 1970; Toronto 
1970. (One Man) Marquis Glass, Berkeley 1969; 
Marquis and Naess: Glass from the Zut Dust Factory, 
San Diego 1969. 



Richard Charles Marquis 



Works: 1. Little Red Riding Hood's Grandma's 
House Landscape Bottle with Trees and 
Chimney Smoke— Night Side and Day Side. 
5 1 /2 inches high, opaque white, pea soup green, 
tree green, grey, blue, red, black, purple. 2. Little 
Red Riding Hood's Grandma's House Landscape 
Snuff Bottle— Shady Side and Sunny Side. 4Vi 
inches high. Cream of pea soup green, pea soup 
green, tree green, tree trunk orange, opaque 
white, black, red, yellow. 3. American Acid Capsule 
in Bag. 3Vz inches long. Red, white and blue. 
4a-c. Group of Mold-blown Organic Bottles. Each 
3Va inches high. Vaseline green and purple stripes; 
Red bubbly with handle; Blue and gold with 
vaseline handle. 5a-c. Group of American 
Hexagonal Bottles. Each 3 inches high. Stars 
and Stripes— red, white and blue; Stars only (for Star 
in LA); Stars and Stripes— red, white, blue and yellow 
with star on bottom. 6a-c. Group of Glass Cups. 3V2, 4, 
3Vt inches high. The Yellow and White Striped Trash 
Can Cup; Proto- American Iridized Striped Cup — 
red, white and blue; Every Sensitive Person's 
Favorite Colors Cup — pink, yellow and white. 



Illustrated 

Left to right, No. 6c, b, a, No. 2, No. 3, No. 7c, a, b 




Background: Parsons School of Design 1951-4; 
American Institute of Graphic Arts 1953-4; State 
University of New York College of Ceramics B. F. A.; 
M. F. A. 1960-3. Studied with Antonio Frasconi and 
Richard Kjaergaard. Designer for Donald Deskey 
Associates, New York 1954-7; Bj0rn & Bernadotte, 
Copenhagen, 1958; Lippencott & Margulies, New 
York 1959-60; Frank Gianninota Associates, New 
York 1960. Director of Design Blenko Glass Company, 
Milton, West Virginia 1963-70. Taught summers at 
Alfred 1962; Haystack 1965; Penland 1967-70; Art 
Institute of Chicago 1969. Author "Joel Myers and 
Blenko Glass," Craft Horizons, March/April 1964. 
Panelist First World Congress of Craftsmen, New 
York 1964. Present Position: Illinois State University, 
Normal, Illinois. 

Selected Exhibitions: (Group) Scripps 1965, 1968; 
TGN I 1966; *TGN II 1968; Craftsmen 1966; Wichita 
1966; *1968, *1970; Boston 1966; Form & Quality, Inter- 
national Handicrafts and Trade Fair, Munich 1966; 
Austin 1967; Dallas 1967; Chico 1969; Excellence 
1969; Objects USA 1969-70; NCECA 1970; Toronto 
1970. (One Man) Bowling Green State University, 
Ohio 1966; Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New 
York 1967; Alfred 1968; Huntington Galleries, Hunting- 
ton, West Virginia 1 969; Lee Nordness, New York 1 970. 

Collections: Krannert Art Museum, University of 
Illinois, Champaign-Urbana; Mint Museum of Art, 
Charlotte, North Carolina; Museum of Contemporary 
Crafts, New York; West Virginia State Collection, 
Charleston; Wichita Art Association; TMA; Chicago 
Art Institute School; Huntington Galleries, Hunting- 
ton, West Virginia. 



Joel Philip Myers 



Works: 1. Dr. Zharchov's Red. 34 inches high. 
Multi-tiered construction of blown forms. 2. The 
Mirror of Dr. Zharchov. 27 inches high. Multi-tiered 
construction of blown forms platinum lustered and 
mirrored. Chrome base. 3. Blue Dr. Zharchov. 
32 Z M inches high. Multi-tiered construction of 
blown forms platinum lustered. Chrome base. 
4. Untitled Form. 13 inches high. Blown clear glass 
with multi-lustered painting. 5. Dr. Zharchov's 
Gold and Red. 23Va inches high. Multi-tiered 
construction of blown forms gold lustered. 6. 
Untitled Form. 12 inches high. Blown ruby glass 
with platinum drawing, silver on surface-hot. 
7. Dr. Zharchov's Tenuously Touching. 23Vz 
inches high. Multi-tiered construction of blown 
forms platinum lustered. 8. Dr. Zharchov's Inverted. 
20 inches high. Multi-tiered construction of blown 
forms platinum lustered and mirrored. Chrome base. 

9. White Things. 21, 33, 37, 53 inches high. White, 
opal, manufactured, mold blown constructed forms 
platinum lustered and multi-lustered painted. 

10. Huldre Mirror. Crystal forms platinum and color 
lustered on 3 by 5 foot chrome plate. 



Illustrated 

Left to right, No. 4, No. 5, No. 7